Thinking better: The art of the shortcut

7.00pm to 8.30pm, Monday 8 November

Theatre / Online

The Royal Institution of Great Britain GB United Kingdom W1S 4BS 21 Albemarle Street London

This event has already taken place

  • A road we could all do with taking...

    Credit: Nic McPhee via Flickr

Price

Theatre audience: £16/£10/£7 Members / Livestream audience: pay what you can

Event description

How do you remember more and forget less? How can you earn more and become more creative just by moving house? And how do you pack a car boot most efficiently?

Join mathematician Marcus du Sautoy as he interrogates his passion for shortcuts. After all, shortcuts have enabled so much of human progress, whether in constructing the first cities around the Euphrates 5,000 years ago, using calculus to determine the scale of the universe or in writing today’s algorithms that help us find a new life partner.

Copies of Marcus's latest book 'Thinking better: the art of the shortcut' are available from Amazon and all good bookshops.

Book tickets

Event type

This is a theatre event, where the speaker and audience in our theatre are joined by an online audience.

Tickets to attend in person or to watch the livestream are both available from this page.

Please note that we are following Government and Public Health England advice, as we have been throughout the Covid-19 pandemic and will continue to review our approach as that guidance changes.

At the moment we are asking event attendees to continue following steps to make the Ri Covid-secure, such as wearing a face covering.

About the speaker

Marcus du Sautoy is the Charles Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science at the Oxford University, a chair he holds jointly at the Department of Continuing Education and the Mathematical Institute. He is also a Professor of Mathematics and a Fellow of New College. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2016. In 2001 he won the prestigious Berwick Prize of the London Mathematical Society awarded every two years to reward the best mathematical research made by a mathematician under 40. In 2004 Esquire Magazine chose him as one of the 100 most influential people under 40 in Britain and in 2008 he was included in the prestigious directory Who’s Who. In 2009 he was awarded the Royal Society’s Faraday Prize, the UK’s premier award for excellence in communicating science. He received an OBE for services to science in the 2010 New Year’s Honours List. He also received the Joint Policy for Mathematics Board Communications Award for 2010 and the London Mathematical Society Zeeman Medal for 2014 for promotion of mathematics to the public.

 

Timing

The live stream will go live at 6.55pm, and the introduction will begin at 7.00pm. If you register but miss the live stream, the video will be available to you via the same link for up to a week after the event date.

For those attending in-person, doors to the theatre will open at 6.30pm. The event will begin at 7.00pm. 

The Royal Institution is part of the Amazon Affiliate Programme and book links on this page are affiliate links, which means it won't cost you any extra but we may earn a small commission if you decide to purchase through the link. All proceeds help support the charitable work of the Ri. Affiliate disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate The Royal Institution earns from qualifying purchases.

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