Our idiot brains

7.00pm to 8.30pm, Friday 24 March

The Theatre

This event has already taken place

  • The idiot brain

    Credit: Dean Burnett
  • Type

    Talk
  • Speakers

    • Dean Burnett

Price

Standard £14

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Concession £10

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Members and Patrons £7

Event description

It’s common to hear just how amazing, powerful and beyond-our-understanding the human brain is. It’s seemingly implied that we should be grateful that such a thing would deign to inhabit our thick skulls. But… what if it’s not perfect? What if it’s actually rather flawed? In honour of the paperback release of his book ‘The Idiot Brain’, neuroscientist, lecturer and comedian Dean Burnett is joined onstage by a panel of his fellow neuroscientists and psychologists to discuss just how weird, illogical and downright surreal the workings of the brain can get.

In honour of the paperback release of his book ‘The Idiot Brain’, neuroscientist, lecturer and comedian Dean Burnett is joined onstage by a panel of his fellow neuroscientists and psychologists to discuss just how weird, illogical and downright surreal the workings of the brain can get. 

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It’s common to hear just how amazing, powerful and beyond-our-understanding the human brain is. It’s seemingly implied that we should be grateful that such a thing would deign to inhabit our thick skulls. But… what if it’s not perfect? What if it’s actually rather flawed? In honour of the paperback release of his book ‘The Idiot Brain’, neuroscientist, lecturer and comedian Dean Burnett is joined onstage by a panel of his fellow neuroscientists and psychologists to discuss just how weird, illogical and downright surreal the workings of the brain can get.
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Attendance

About the speakers

Dean Burnett is a neuroscientist, lecturer and tutor for the Centre for Medical Education at Cardiff University. He writes a neuroscience blog for the Guardian, Brain Flapping.

Suzi Gage is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Bristol, investigating associations between substance use and mental health. She writes the epidemiology and public health column Sifting the evidence at the Guardian.

Pete Etchells is a lecturer in biological psychology at Bath Spa University. His interests include vision, eye movements and motion perception. He writes for Mind games, a Guardian series on classic psychology experiments.

Chris Chambers is a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the school of psychology, Cardiff University. He is interested in cognition and writes for Mind games and Head quarters, a series on new psychology discoveries

Thalia Gjersoe is a developmental psychologist at the University of Bath, who is interested in magical beliefs. She also writes for Head quarters.

Book signing

After the talk, there will be an opportunity to buy books and have them signed by the author.

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