Spring programme just launched!

Our programme of public events taking place from January to April 2015 is now ready to explore and enjoy.

  • Scanning electron micrograph of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and a dead human neutrophil. 

    Credit: NIAID

News

We're pleased to announce our latest programme of public events covering quantum theory, microbiology, perception, the chemistry of steel and everything in-between.

We're pleased to be welcoming Fields Medal winner Cédric Villani, American philosopher and cognitive scientist Daniel Dennett and Turner prize winner Grayson Perry in our star-studded programme of events.

All our public events between January and April are now live on our website and available to book, or you can download the full programme to plan your visits to the Ri through these winter months until spring arrives.

Remember that Ri members get free entry to over 60 events a year, and membership starts at just £15 a year for juniors. Why not give the gift of membership this year for Christmas?

Read on to find out more about what's in store....

International Year of Light

As part of our celebration of International Year of Light 2015, Sarah Kendrew will explore the telescopes of the future in March, while Kate Lancaster will be introducing us to the incredible world of intense lasers in April, as we devote two Discourses to the theme of light. Meanwhile, Roberto Trotta will explain what the oldest light in the cosmos can tell us about the very beginnings of the Universe and how he has tried to describe it using only the most common 1,000 words in English!

From antibiotics to art in our 2015 Discourses

As well as being the forum for some of the greatest discoveries in science, Discourses have also invited contributions from those outside of science, such as Joan Evans, HG Wells, Yehudi Menuin and Roger Bannister. Continuing this tradition next February is Turner Prize winning artist Grayson Perry who will explore what art does best, alongside other monthly Discourses on telescopes, lasers and antibiotic resistance.

  • Artist's impression of the European Extremely Large Telescope

    Credit: ESO/L. Calçada, via Wikimedia Commons

  • Two lasers going through diffusers

    Credit: Douglas Muth via Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/dmuth

Quantum biology with Jim Al-Khalili

How might quantum theory, a powerful theory of the subatomic world, manifest itself at the biological level? We’re pleased to be welcoming Jim Al-Khalili as a guest-curator at the Ri for three events all about quantum biology to answer this question with researchers from around the UK.

Fun for all the family

With more Faraday junior members than ever before, we will hold a whole host of family-friendly events that appeal to all ages. Jamie Gallagher will delve into the explosions, poisonings and space exploration behind the periodic table, Matt Parker will show the fun and games of mathematics and Andrew Szydlo will be back to wow audiences with his showmanship and science. If you want another opportunity to play, create and transform things around you, come to our Family Fun Day: ‘Sparks will fly’ on 21 February, based on the theme of the 2014 CHRISTMAS LECTURES.

  • Holding stick insects at Ri Lates: Rules of attraction

    Credit: Katherine Leesdale

  • One of Andrew Szydlo's demonstrations

    Credit: Ri

Ri Lates: Science play for grown-ups

Can you trust what you perceive? How might our brain play tricks on us, and what if two seemingly different phenomena are occurring at once? After the success of our first adults-only Lates event in October, we continue this new series on the theme of reality. If you missed our first one, ‘Rules of attraction’, read what other people thought! I,Science and Victoria Sadler both wrote up their experiences and don’t forget to take a look at some pictures to get an idea of what to expect next time.

Behind the science of hit TV

Recent hit TV shows, Game of Thrones and Breaking Bad, have filled our TV screens with chemistry, ideas of morality, fantastical creatures and fearsome battles, but what kind of science (if any!) lies behind the worlds they inhabit? Comedy writer and performer Helen Keen and award-winning broadcaster Claudia Hammond will explore the science of these popular TV series.